Category Archives: Archival description & finding aids

“The Hidden Curse of Automation” & archives

A friend on Facebook posted a link to this Los Angeles Review of Books article by Clive Thompson about Nicholas Carr’s book The Glass Cage: Automation and Us. The review raises many issues, but as usual I was reading it with … Continue reading

Posted in Archival description & finding aids, History & related professions | 2 Comments

Innovative Practices in Archives & Special Collections: Description – Table of Contents now available

As many of you may know, I’m editing a series of books on “Innovative Practices in Archives & Special Collections” for Rowman & Littlefield. The first four books are scheduled to be available this May, and I’m pleased to be … Continue reading

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My talk from #AHA14: A Distinction worth Exploring: “Archives” and “Digital Historical Representations”

A few weeks ago I was part of the panel, “Digital Historiography and the Archives” at the 2014 meeting of the American Historical Association. [UPDATE: All papers from this session are now available online here.] As with my previous foray into … Continue reading

Posted in Archival description & finding aids, History & related professions | 8 Comments

Guest post: Megan McShea responds to “Does the Creation of EAD Finding Aids Inhibit Archival Activities?”

Below is a response to “Does the Creation of EAD Finding Aids Inhibit Archival Activities?,” a post by Joshua Ranger on the AV Preserve site. I’m sharing it on behalf on the author, Megan McShea, Audiovisual Archivist at the Archives of … Continue reading

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Metadata is a foreign concept? Whaaaat?!? (Part Two) – A guest post by Greg Bak

[This is the second guest post by Greg Bak, Archival Studies, Department of History, University of Manitoba.] Thanks again to Kate for agreeing to publish my presentation on her blog. In Part One of this guest post I discuss some … Continue reading

Posted in Archival description & finding aids, Archival theory, Conferences | 3 Comments

Metadata is a foreign concept? Whaaaat?!? (Part One) – A guest post by Greg Bak

[This is a guest post by Greg Bak, Archival Studies, Department of History, University of Manitoba. ] Thanks to Kate for agreeing to publish my recent SAA presentation on her blog. In Part One of this guest post I discuss … Continue reading

Posted in Archival description & finding aids, Archival theory, Conferences | 6 Comments

Debate: “Although digitization is useful for accessibility, detailed online item-level cataloguing is even more so”

I remember seeing that tweet from the “‘Democratising or Privileging: the Future of Access to Archives” conference at University of Dundee last week and thinking that many in the U.S. might find it a controversial statement. I was reminded of it  this … Continue reading

Posted in Archival description & finding aids | 30 Comments

Archives who have implemented linked data?

On Twitter I asked for suggestions of archives who have implemented linked data (or perhaps I should say linked open data?). I got a few responses from people who were beginning to implement or starting projects, but not much else. … Continue reading

Posted in Archival description & finding aids | 11 Comments

A question for archivists with experience in the pre-Internet era

In a related, but different question that the one posed to researchers in the previous post, I would like the input of archivists with experience in the pre-Internet era. In the post targeted at researchers, I said: … my hypothesis … Continue reading

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A question for researchers with experience in the pre-Internet era

I’d like to confirm what I think is a pretty logical assumption about the driver for changes in archival practice. To do this I would like the input of people who conducted research in archives before the glorious age of … Continue reading

Posted in Archival description & finding aids, History & related professions | 6 Comments